Applies to laying tiles as well as to bonding components: surface roughness and adhesive thickness have to be ideally matched.

Applies to laying tiles as well as to bonding components: surface roughness and adhesive thickness have to be ideally matched.

Bonding Blog Series: Post 2

Bonding is smart: we know why!

Adhesives are increasingly replacing mechanical fasteners. That’s why Schreiner ProTech is taking a look at this topic in a series of blog posts. This post is focused on basic knowledge: what performance does an adhesive have to deliver and how does adhesive bonding work?

The benefits of adhesives are obvious and we previously addressed them in our blog post “Firmly connected: bonding is brilliant!” Compared with mechanical fastening techniques, adhesive bonding saves weight, allows for greater freedom of design and, thanks to better force distribution, can increase component life. So, bonding is smart: but why? What performance does a perfect adhesive have to deliver? Two keywords provide the answer: adhesion and cohesion. Huh?

Both words are derived from Latin. Adhesion (Latin adhaerere “to adhere”) is the force that bonds one material to another, in this case an adhesive to a substrate. Cohesion (Latin cohaerere “to stick together”) on the other hand describes the force that keeps “similar things” together. In this context, it is the internal strength of a adhesive and refers to its ability to resist a force being applied in parallel to the surface. If cohesion is insufficient, an adhesive will break under stress and the bond will disintegrate. This raises the question of when an adhesive bond is effective.

The surface and adhesive have to be matched. Important in this context is the type of substrate, such as metal, paint, anti-adhesive coatings and low-energy plastic surfaces, all of which require an adhesive specifically suiting them. But that’s not all, as factors like surface roughness and adhesive thickness should not be underrated either. The thickness of the adhesive coating should be at least equal to and up to twice as high as the roughness of the surface. For very rough surfaces, it makes sense to apply a thick coating of a soft adhesive. Cleanliness has consequences for adhesive bonding as well: the bonding surface has to be free of dust and other adherent substances such as oil films or release agents.

Schreiner ProTech is going to address all aspects relevant to adhesive bonding as a joining solution. The blog post that kicked off the series was focused on joining solutions in general. Topics to be covered in the next few weeks: When should bonding be used and what are the differences between liquid and pressure-sensitive adhesives? What are the key criteria of selecting an adhesive? What additional functions can be performed by self-adhesive die-cut parts? Finally, we’re going to show you specific application examples from various industries.

You can find an overview of all blog posts from our adhesive bonding series here: //www.schreinergroup-blog.com/en/category/subjects/productstechnologies/bonding-en/

Find more information on Schreiner Protech on schreiner-protech.com

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  1. […] questions have been covered to date: What capabilities does an adhesive have to deliver and how does adhesive bonding work? When should adhesive bonding be used and what are the differences between liquid and […]

  2. […] solution, focused on the following questions What performance does an adhesive have to deliver and how does adhesive bonding work?. When should adhesive bonding be used and what are the differences […]

  3. […] focused on joining solutions in general, followed by basic questions centered on adhesive bonding: when should adhesive bonding be used and what are the differences between liquid and pressure-sensitive adhesive bonding? The next post […]

  4. […] focused on joining solutions in general, followed by basic questions centered on adhesive bonding: when should adhesive bonding be used and what are the differences between liquid and pressure-sensitive adhesive bonding? Finally, […]

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This post is also available in: German