“Bonding is a matter of faith, bolting a matter of trust!?” Our blog series is intended to put an end to this preconceived notion.

“Bonding is a matter of faith, bolting a matter of trust!?” Our blog series is intended to put an end to this preconceived notion.

Bonding Blog Series: Post 1

Firmly connected: bonding is brilliant!

How can I join two assembly components? If you’re looking for the technique best suiting your specific application, you need to ask the right questions – and find appropriate answers. In a new blog series, Schreiner ProTech takes a look at all aspects relating to adhesive bonding.

“Bonding is a matter of faith, bolting a matter of trust!?” This is a preconceived notion that still exists and pops up now and then. Mechanical fastening systems have been regarded as secure and solid for many years. Bolting, crimping, welding and soldering are some of the classic joining techniques commonly used in industrial environments. However, these methods aren’t able to meet every requirement.

Mechanical methods—no doubt—create very strong connections. But drill holes, threads and the required wall thickness may significantly limit the design of a component. Due to the concentrated load acting on the joint, the effect of the force is not evenly distributed and the material may be prone to fatigue due to constant, unilateral stress. As a result of varying expansion coefficients of the joined components, mechanical fastening solutions may lead to strain causing the connection to break. Elasticity, for instance of pressure-sensitive adhesives, can reduce or even completely prevent such strain.
Last but not least, mechanical methods increase a component’s weight and assembly space in contrast to the clearly unbroken trend toward “small and light.” Plus, there’s the process itself. In addition to the initial investment required for mechanical fastening solutions, the frequently high operating costs incurred in the joining process itself have to be considered as well. Most mechanical fastening methods only permit manual or partially automated application—not really a fast way of doing the job and one that results in higher expense and longer cycle times. Adhesive bonding solutions on the other hand typically lend themselves well to automation.

Besides process times and costs, there are other important questions to ask when trying to make a choice between “bonding” and “bolting” such as: How important is design in my case? Do I have to apply very small components? If the answer to either of these is YES, then bonding may well be an option worth investigating. But that’s not all: Does my application involve delicate geometries, possibly even a smooth surface without drill holes but with small piercings? Is cleanliness important in my process? If these two questions are answered positively as well, then solutions using pressure-sensitive adhesives definitely merit a closer look, because: bonding is brilliant! Follow us on our blog as we explain the key aspects of bonding over the next few weeks.

Schreiner ProTech is going to address all aspects relevant to bonding as a joining solution, focused on the following questions: What performance does an adhesive have to deliver and how does adhesive bonding work? When should bonding be used and what are the differences between liquid and pressure-sensitive adhesives? What are the key criteria of selecting an adhesive? What additional functions can be performed by self-adhesive die-cut parts? Finally, we’re going to show you specific application examples from various industries.

You can find an overview of all blog posts from our adhesive bonding series here: //www.schreinergroup-blog.com/en/category/subjects/productstechnologies/bonding-en/

Find more information on Schreiner Protech on schreiner-protech.com

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Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] as a joining solution in a series of blog posts. The following questions have been covered to date: What capabilities does an adhesive have to deliver and how does adhesive bonding work? When should adhesive bonding be used and what are the […]

  2. […] to adhesive bonding as a joining solution. The blog post that kicked off the series was focused on joining solutions in general, followed by basic questions centered on adhesive bonding: when should adhesive bonding be used and […]

  3. […] to adhesive bonding as a joining solution. The blog post that kicked off the series was focused on joining solutions in general, followed by basic questions centered on adhesive bonding: when should adhesive bonding be used and […]

  4. […] ProTech is addressing all aspects relevant to adhesive bonding as a joining solution. The blog post that kicked off the series was focused on joining solutions in general and the basic properties of […]

  5. […] benefits of adhesives are obvious and we previously addressed them in our blog post “Firmly connected: bonding is brilliant!” Compared with mechanical fastening techniques, adhesive bonding saves weight, allows for greater […]

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